Jerry Lee Hatley | RE/MAX Mountain Realty | Maggie Valley NC Real Estate
Jerry Lee Hatley | RE/MAX Mountain Realty | Maggie Valley NC Real Estate

Jerry Lee Hatley | RE/MAX Mountain Realty | Maggie Valley NC Real Estate
Jerry Lee Hatley | RE/MAX Mountain Realty | Maggie Valley NC Real Estate
Jerry Lee Hatley | RE/MAX Mountain Realty | Maggie Valley NC Real Estate
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Jerry Lee Hatley | RE/MAX Mountain Realty | Maggie Valley NC Real Estate
Jerry Lee Hatley | RE/MAX Mountain Realty | Maggie Valley NC Real Estate








Jerry Lee Hatley | RE/MAX Mountain Realty | Maggie Valley NC Real Estate
Jerry Lee Hatley | RE/MAX Mountain Realty | Maggie Valley NC Real Estate
Jerry Lee Hatley | RE/MAX Mountain Realty | Maggie Valley NC Real Estate
Jerry Lee Hatley | RE/MAX Mountain Realty | Maggie Valley NC Real Estate Jerry Lee Hatley | RE/MAX Mountain Realty | Maggie Valley NC Real Estate Jerry Lee Hatley | RE/MAX Mountain Realty | Maggie Valley NC Real Estate

 
The Great Smoky Mountains National Park
The Great Smoky Mountains National Park

The Great Smoky Mountains National Park

A Wondrous Diversity of Life
Ridge upon ridge of forest straddles the border between North Carolina and Tennessee in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. World renowned for its diversity of plant and animal life, the beauty of its ancient mountains, and the quality of its remnants of Southern Appalachian mountain culture, this is America's most visited national park.

www.nps.gov/grsm/index.htm

 

 

 

History and Culture:

Great Smoky Mountains National Park preserves a rich cultural tapestry of Southern Appalachian history. The mountains have had a long human history spanning thousands of years-from the prehistoric Paleo Indians to early European settlement in the 1800s to loggers and Civilian Conservation Corps enrollees in the 20th century.

The park strives to protect the historic structures, landscapes, and artifacts that tell the varied stories of people who once called these mountains home.


People:

:People have occupied these mountains since prehistoric times, but it was not until the 20th century that human activities began to profoundly affect the natural course of events here.

When the first white settlers reached the Great Smoky Mountains in the late 1700s they found themselves in the land of the Cherokee Indians. The tribe, one of the most culturally advanced on the continent, had permanent towns, cultivated croplands, sophisticated political systems, and extensive networks of trails. Most of the Cherokee were forcibly removed in the 1830s to Oklahoma in a tragic episode known as the "trail of Tears. The few who remained are the ancestors of the Cherokees living near the park today.

Life for the early European settlers was primitive, but by the 1900s there was little difference between the mountain people and their contemporaries living in rural areas beyond the mountains. Earlier settlers had lived off the land by hunting the wildlife, utilizing the timber for buildings and fences, growing food, and pasturing livestock in the clearings. As the decades passed, many areas that had once been forest became fields and pastures. People farmed, attended church, hauled their grain to the mill, and maintained community ties in a typically rural fashion.

The agricultural pattern of life in the Great Smoky Mountains changed with the arrival of lumbering in the early 1900s. Within 20 years, the largely self-sufficient economy of the people here was almost entirely replaced by dependence on manufactured items, store bought food, and cash. Logging boom towns sprang up overnight at sites that still bear their names: Elkmont, Smokemont, Proctor, Tremont.

Loggers were rapidly cutting the great primeval forests that remained on these mountains. Unless the course of events could be quickly changed, there would be little left of the region’s special character and wilderness resources. Intervention came when Great Smoky Mountains National Park was established in 1934. The forest—at least the 20% that remained uncut within park boundaries—was saved.

More than 1,200 land-owners had to leave their land once the park was established. They left behind many farm buildings, mills, schools, and churches. Over 70 of these structures have since been preserved so that Great Smoky Mountains National Park now contains the largest collection of historic log buildings in the East.


Nature and Science:

Biological diversity is the hallmark of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which encompasses over 800 square miles in the Southern Appalachian Mountains. No other area of equal size in a temperate climate can match the park's amazing diversity of plants, animals, and invertebrates. Over 17,000 species have been documented in the park: Scientists believe an additional 30,000-80,000 species may live here.

Why such a wondrous diversity? Mountains, glaciers, and weather are the big reasons. The park is the largest federally protected upland landmass east of the Mississippi River. Dominated by plant-covered, gently contoured mountains, the crest of the Great Smokies forms the boundary between Tennessee and North Carolina, bisecting the park from northeast to southwest in an unbroken chain that rises more than 5,000 feet for over 36 miles. Elevations in the park range from 875 to 6,643 feet. This range in altitude mimics the latitudinal changes you would experience driving north or south across the eastern United States, say from Georgia to Maine. Plants and animals common in the southern United States thrive in the lowlands of the Smokies while species common in the northern states find suitable habitat at the higher elevations.

The Great Smoky Mountains are among the oldest mountains in the world, formed perhaps 200-300 million years ago. They are unique in their northeast to southwest orientation, which allowed species to migrate along their slopes during climatic changes such as the last ice age, 10,000 years ago. In fact, the glaciers of the last ice age affected the Smoky Mountains without invading them. During that time, glaciers scoured much of North America but did not quite reach as far south as the Smokies. Consequently, these mountains became a refuge for many species of plants and animals that were disrupted from their northern homes. The Smokies have been relatively undisturbed by glaciers or ocean inundation for over a million years, allowing species eons to diversify.

In terms of weather, the park's abundant rainfall and high summertime humidity provide excellent growing conditions. In the Smokies, the average annual rainfall varies from approximately 55 inches in the valleys to over 85 inches on some peaks-more than anywhere else in the country except the Pacific Northwest. During wet years, over eight feet of rain falls in the high country. The relative humidity in the park during the growing season is about twice that of the Rocky Mountain region.

Some 100 species of native trees find homes in the Smokies, more than in any other North American national park. Almost 95% of the park is forested, and about 25% of that area is old-growth forest-one of the largest blocks of deciduous, temperate, old-growth forest remaining in North America. Over 1,500 additional flowering plant species have been identified in the park. The park is the center of diversity for lungless salamanders and is home to more than 200 species of birds, 66 types of mammals, 50 native fish species, 39 varieties of reptiles, and 43 species of amphibians. Mollusks, millipedes, and mushrooms reach record diversity here.

In recognition of the park's unique natural resources, the United Nations has designated Great Smoky Mountains National Park as an International Biosphere Reserve.

 

Information courtesy of: http://www.nps.gov/grsm/index.htm

 
Other Area Attractions and Links of Interest
  • Bele Chere
  • Looking Glass Falls
  • Folkmoot USA
  • Maggie Valley NC
  • Ghost Town in The Sky
  • Biltmore House and Gardens
  • Harrah's Cherokee Casino & Hotel
  • Mount Mitchell State Park
  • Hendersonville, NC
  • Museum of North Carolina Handicrafts
  • North Carolina Apple Festival
  • The Great Smoky Mountains National Park
  • Sliding Rock
  • The Grove Park Inn
  • The Haywood Arts Regional Theatre: HART
  • The Nantahala National Forest
  • The Pisgah National Forest
  • The Wheels Through Time Museum
  • WNC Mountain State Fair
  • Waynesville, NC
  •  
    Jerry Lee Hatley | RE/MAX Mountain Realty | Maggie Valley NC Real Estate Jerry Lee Hatley | RE/MAX Mountain Realty | Maggie Valley NC Real Estate Jerry Lee Hatley | RE/MAX Mountain Realty | Maggie Valley NC Real Estate
    Jerry Lee Hatley | RE/MAX Mountain Realty | Maggie Valley NC Real Estate
    Jerry Lee Hatley | RE/MAX Mountain Realty | Maggie Valley NC Real Estate

    Short Sale Specialist: Jerry Lee Hatley
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    Short Sale Incentives:
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    The nation’s leading mortgage lenders are extending extras for short sale transactions employed as an alternative to foreclosure – both in the form of monetary incentives for borrowers and streamlined procedures for real estate agents. read more.......

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    Jerry Lee Hatley | RE/MAX Mountain Realty | Maggie Valley NC Real Estate
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